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03 Dec.2015 ,

European paper industry's views on the Circular Economy package

The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) welcomes the long-awaited Circular Economy package that was launched by the European Commission. By recognising the contribution of biomass and bio-based products to the Circular Economy the European Commission now takes into account that circularity in many cases starts with raw materials from renewable sources. CEPI is looking forward to concrete actions in the field of bio-based product in the future. In addition, the European Commission has recognised the importance of ending waste management options that do not create value for Europe. CEPI also believes that the Commission is right in recognising recyclability as waste prevention and in harmonising the method for the calculation of recycling rates to make data more comparable and reliable. The European paper industry, together with its partners in the paper value chain, is about to publish the European Declaration on Paper Recycling committing to a further increase in paper recycling from today’s already high 71,7% paper recycling rate.

Read the full press release here.

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02 Dec.2015 ,

European Commission delivers value: Circular Economy package recognises renewability and closes the loop

The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) welcomes the Circular Economy package that was launched by the European Commission today. “Our expectations have been met. This major policy initiative has correctly identified the synergies needed to find real solutions. The package has reached a level of ambition rarely seen in policymaking,” says Marco Mensink, CEPI Director General.


By recognising the contribution of biomass and bio-based products to the Circular Economy the European Commission now takes into account that circularity in many cases starts with raw materials from renewable sources. CEPI is looking forward to concrete actions in the field of bio-based product in the future.


In addition, the European Commission has recognised the importance of ending waste management options that do not create value for Europe.


Marco Mensink says: “It is great to see that the Commission recognises the need for separate collection of paper, providing good quality raw materials. We also appreciate that further limits to landfilling are being put in place”. This is a file where the needs of industry closely align with many other stakeholder positions. The Commission proposes a logical step forward. “A step that should be taken from legislation to reality as soon as possible.”


CEPI also believes that the Commission is right in recognising recyclability as waste prevention and in harmonising the method for the calculation of recycling rates to make data more comparable and reliable. The European paper industry, together with its partners in the paper value chain, is about to publish the European Declaration on Paper Recycling committing to a further increase in paper recycling from today’s already high 71,7% paper recycling rate.


For more information, please contact Annette Requardt at a.requardt@cepi.org, mobile +32 489 84 8950


Note to the Editor
CEPI aisbl - The Confederation of European Paper Industries
The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is a Brussels-based non-profit organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 505 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 920 paper mills. Together they represent 23% of world production.

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01 Dec.2015 ,

The Paper Packaging Industry’s view on the Circular Economy Legislative Package

The Paper Packaging Coordination Group comprises the major European paper and board packaging associations¹ which represent the interests of a wide range of packaging products used in transport, retail and consumer packaging. Paper and board packaging is based on a renewable resource (the forest) and is recyclable. We support the concept of a Circular Economy in which raw materials are sourced from renewable, responsibly managed resources and where possible, recycled after use.

The members of our associations are directly affected by proposals in the Circular Economy legislative package published today, which amend the waste and packaging waste legislation. We will submit our detailed responses to specific proposals when we have had time to study them, but meanwhile we wish to present our joint approach on the major topics which affect us:

1. Recycling targets for paper and board
• Targets should be ambitious and reflect technical and economic realities
• For materials, a clear focus on recycling should be ensured
• Packaging recycling targets should be proportionate between different consumer packaging materials, fairly taking into account each material’s situation, achievements and potential for improvement. High achievement of one packaging material should not compensate for another material’s lower achievement.

2. Need to revise the calculation method before setting new targets
• The method for the calculation of recycling rates should be harmonised, providing clarity and simplification for ease of application
• The “input” method should be the basis of the calculation
• EU requirements for recycling should apply equally to exports of paper for recycling and should be enforced

3. Design of packaging
• Additional mandatory design requirements at national level for packaging will undermine the objectives of the Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive (PPWD)

4. Composition of municipal waste
• Retailers should have the freedom to choose the method of collection of their secondary and tertiary packaging waste

5. Minimum requirements for Extended Producer Responsibility
• The scope of EPR and roles and responsibilities of each actor involved in packaging waste management should be clearly defined

6. Landfill and incineration of waste
• Recyclables should not be sent to landfill
• Separate collection of materials should be strengthened
• Incineration of recyclables should be restricted

7. Ecodesign and product design
• The essential requirements in the PPWD and related CEN standards are sufficient to provide guidance for ecodesign of packaging
• Packaging should serve the functionality and the safety of the product first
• Packaging should not be seen in isolation from the product
• Ecodesign concepts as part of a product’s design, should encompass the whole life cycle of the product with its packaging

8. Renewability of material resources
• Renewability of material resources is a natural driver for circularity and should be an essential element of a Circular Economy

We particularly welcome the consideration of the role of the bioeconomy in Circular Economy thinking, as we have strongly advocated that sustainable, natural, renewable resources play an essential role in completing the loop of a Circular Economy.

For further information please read the Paper Packaging Coordination Group’s position paper on the Circular Economy package: http://www.cepi.org/positionpaper/PPCGcirculareconomy

 
¹Currently the following organisations participate in the Paper Packaging Coordination Group:

CEPI, Confederation of European Paper Industries
CEPI Containerboard, European industry association of producers of corrugated case materials
CITPA, International Confederation of Paper & Board Converters
ACE, The Alliance for Beverage Cartons and the Environment
ECMA, European Carton Makers Association
EMBALPACK, European Association of Makers of Packaging Papers
EMFA, European Moulded Fibre Association
CEPI EUROKRAFT, European Producers of Sack Kraft Paper and Kraft Paper
EUROSAC, European Federation of Multiwall Paper Sack Manufacturers
FEFCO, European Federation of Corrugated Board Manufacturers
PRO CARTON, European Association of Carton and Cartonboard Manufacturers
 

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01 Dec.2015 ,

EU ETS: Six steps to ensure industry’s competitiveness

The EU ETS reform, published on 15 July, presents several positive elements that contribute to improving the predictability of the regulatory framework. However, these improvements are not yet sufficient in protecting the competitiveness of energy intensive industries, ensuring adequate regulatory stability and predictability, and in stimulating investments in low-carbon technologies.


From 2005 to 2014, our industry has reduced carbon emissions by 26%, resulting in 21% carbon-intensity reduction. We have been early-movers in low-carbon investments and have plans to grow our business in Europe, building synergies with circular economy and the bioeconomy.
To bring environmental protection in line with industry competitiveness, we ask to:


1. Remove artificial cap on free credits to industry.
Artificially capping access to free credits depresses future investments: it means acceptingdeindustrialisation as a legitimate way to reduce emissions in Europe, even if this wouldincrease Europe’s carbon footprint in the world.
The artificial cap will also lead, sooner or later, to the application of the cross-sectoralcorrection factor (CSCF). This is the most unfair among all instruments, as it cuts allocationirrespective of industry potentials, neutralises carbon leakage provisions, limits predictability,and punishes investments made by early movers.


2. Keep the proposed approach to benchmarks review, but improve key design aspects.
The benchmark review needs to predictably promote and reward investments in low-carbontechnologies, while finding the right balance between accuracy and administrative burden.Reducing benchmarks at achievable paces, with rules clearly stated upfront, will lowerregulatory risks and reward the installations who will invest in low-carbon technologies.


Looking at the administrative burden, the pulp and paper industry, with more than 700installations in the ETS – 60% of which below 25kt – emitted just 31.6 MtCO2 in 2014.Roughly 1.4% of total ETS emissions. Yet, it is the 2nd biggest sector for number ofbenchmarks (11), covering only about 50% of industry production – the rest being under theso-called fall-back approach. It is self-evident that opting for a full review of benchmark valuesinstead is disproportionately costly while only delivering marginal accuracy improvements.


This is why we look favourably at the approach proposed by the Commission. However, manyparameters need to be reviewed and/or clarified, starting with:
•Linearity of the reduction factor;
•Disruptive impact in moving from one reduction pattern to the other;
•Avoid/reduce administrative burden in data collection and verification;
•Fairly assess progresses for installations in fall-back approaches.


3. Grant to all energy-intensive industries equal protection against present and futurerisks of carbon leakage.
Industry is either exposed to global competition or not: there is no middle ground. In thiscontext, the Commission proposal seems reasonable. Moreover, it is worth noticing that therest of the world does not impose comparable costs on energy intensive industries, withcarbon leakage provisions appearing also in other non-EU countries.


4. Adopt binding EU rules for compensation of indirect carbon costs.
Indirect carbon costs affect industrial international competitiveness as much as direct carboncosts do. The principle of equal treatment in shielding industry from both carbon costs musteffectively and consistently apply in all Member States.


5. Stop penalising investments in industrial Combined Heat and Power (CHP).
In the pulp and paper industry CHP is considered as Best Available Technique. Installations are therefore expected to use this technology. Today however the EU ETS does not send the right investment signal to invest in industrial CHP: the EU ETS grants no free credits for electricity produced and no consistent and adequate compensation for indirect carbon costs is given across Europe either. Given the relevant co-benefits CHP delivers in moving Europe towards a low-carbon economy, corrective measures to provide the right investment signal are urgently needed.


6. Earmark innovation and modernisation funding to energy intensive industries.
The earmarked 450 million allowances is the largest industry innovation fund ever. To deliverits full potential it should be linked to the goal of 2050 sectoral roadmaps, and aimed at thedeployment of new technologies for each Annex I sectors. The modernisation fund should alsoprimarily support low-carbon technologies in industry.


For more information, please contact Nicola Rega, Climate Change and Energy Director, at n.rega@cepi.org, mobile: +32 485 403 412
 

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30 Nov.2015 ,

Global Forest and Paper Industry Releases Policy Statement on Climate Change

The International Council of Forest and Paper Associations (ICFPA) today released its statement on climate change ahead of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change meeting (COP21) in Paris, France. The statement presents the contributions of forests and the forest products industry to the mitigation of global climate change and calls on governments to recognize these contributions. The full statement is available at: http://bit.ly/1MPD7ax.


The ICFPA will elaborate on the forest products industry’s efforts at a COP21 side-event – “Assessing transparency and ambition in the land use and forestry sector”, held at the EU Pavilion on December 1 at 2:30 pm. The side-event will be hosted by the ICFPA and the EU Joint Research Centre.


“Forests and the global forest products industry have a key role in helping to mitigate climate change. A low carbon economy has to consider the forest industry as a contributor to climate solutions”, said Marco Mensink, Director General of the Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI). “With this policy statement, we are encouraging national governments to recognize and foster all positive contributions that forests and forest products provide in combating climate change.”


The industry has made significant contributions to mitigate climate change. In addition to greenhouse gas (GHG) removals and stocking carbon in products, ICFPA members have achieved an impressive drop in their GHG emissions intensity: 5 percent since 2010/2011 and 17 percent since the 2004-2005 baseline year, as shown in the ICFPA 2015 Sustainability Progress Report (2013 data).


The statement calls on governments and the parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change to recognize sustainable forest management and reforestation activities for their contribution to the global climate effort, as well as the recognition of the efforts and achievements of the forest products industry to mitigate climate change, including the carbon neutrality of biomass harvested from sustainably managed forests and the need to provide for market-based mechanisms capable of valuing mitigation actions to incentivize the industry’s potential contribution.


The ICFPA’s statement is the latest in a series of policy statements underwritten by its members associations. All ICFPA policy statements are available at icfpa.org/resource-centre/statements.


The ICFPA serves as a forum of global dialogue, co-ordination and co-operation. Together, ICFPA members represent over 90 percent of global paper production and more than half of global wood production. For more information, visit icfpa.org.

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